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No matter how you’re feeling, your Labrador Retriever is always gonna love you!

Our Labrador Retriever puppies are ready for their new homes

WHO WE ARE

Labrador Retriever Pups Breeder

Hopers Labradors Home has proudly provided U.S homes with cute and healthy Labrador Retriever puppies of love for years. As you browse through our website, you will be able to find and even buy the Labrador Retriever puppy of your choice.

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The Labrador Retriever

Good-looking, smart and fun-loving, the Labrador Retriever has a a lot going for him. He’s large, but not too large, he’s calm and easygoing when he’s not exuberantly fetching a tennis ball or a bird. He’s a do-it-all kind of dog.


A Labrador Retriever has the kind of versatility that other dogs only dream of. He can be a companion, show dog, hunting dog, canine athlete, guide dog, service dog, sniffer dog, search and rescue dog, and therapy dog. He enjoys jogging (health permitting), boating, swimming, hiking and more. If it’s active, outdoors and with his people, the Lab is ready and willing to participate in any activity.







All of those characteristics make the Labrador well-suited to a variety of active families. He’s perfect for homes with rowdy older children, but may be a little rambunctious around toddlers, especially as a puppy or young dog. Singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed, and his size and even temperament make the Labrador a great companion for active seniors who love to walk and would appreciate a dog who looks intimidating, even if he is more of a lover than a fighter.


With adequate exercise, these versatile companions can handle anything from a small city apartment to a vast ranch. What they can’t handle is isolation: if you get a Lab, make him a member of your family, not an outdoor dog.

Labrador Retrievers really love to eat, and become obese very quickly if overfed. Limit treats, give your Lab plenty of exercise, and measure out regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time. And be warned that the Lab's large appetite extends to people food and even inedible items. Labradors will forage in garbage, counter surf, and can make a meal out of chewed-up items like children's toys.

Labs have such a good reputation that many people think they don't need to bother with training. But Labs are large, energetic animals, and like all dogs, they need to be taught good canine manners

Available Labrador Retriever Puppies For Sale

For the past years we have made sure all the puppies we sale are being vaccinated, registered, potty trained and are also good with children and other pets at home.

Available Now

Pablo(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Pablo
Available Now

Oscar(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Oscar
Available Now

Migo(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Migo
Available Now

Mailo(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Mailo
Available Now

Loki(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Loki
Available Now

Lilly(Female)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Lilly
Available Now

Kala(Female)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Kala
Available Now

Flynn(Female)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Flynn
Available Now

Chester(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Chester
Available Now

Bailey(Male)

8 Weeks Old       $800

Labrador Retriever Puppy

Buy Bailey

Caring For Labrador Retrievers

The lovable Lab needs to be around their family, and is definitely not a backyard dog. If they're left alone for too long, they'll probably tarnish their saintly reputation: A lonely, bored Lab is apt to dig, chew, or find other destructive outlets for their energy.


Labs show some variation in their activity levels, but all of them need activity, both physical and mental. Daily 30-minute walks, a romp at the dog park, or a game of fetch, are a few ways to help your Lab burn off energy. However, a puppy should not be taken for too long walks and should play for a few minutes at a time. Labrador Retrievers are considered "workaholics," and will exhaust themselves. It is up to you to end play and training sessions.


Labs have such good reputations that some owners think they don't need training. That's a big mistake. Without training, a rambunctious Lab puppy will soon grow to be a very large, rowdy dog. Luckily, Labs take to training well; in fact, they often excel in obedience competitions.


Start with puppy kindergarten, which not only teaches your pup good canine manners, but helps them learn how to be comfortable around other dogs and people. Look for a class that uses positive training methods that reward the dog for getting it right, rather than punishing them for getting it wrong.


You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Lab puppy. Don't let your Lab puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement until they're at least two years old and their joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility, with its one-inch jumps.


Like all retrievers, the Lab is mouthy, and they're happiest when they have something, anything, to carry in their mouth. They're also a chewer, so be sure to keep sturdy toys available all the time--unless you want your couch chewed up. And when you leave the house, it's wise to keep your Lab in a crate or kennel so they can't get themselves into trouble chewing things they shouldn't.

Feeding Labradors

Recommended daily amount: 2.5 to 3 cups of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals.


Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on their size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don't all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference--the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl.


Keep your Lab in good shape by measuring their food and feeding them twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you're unsure whether they're overweight, give them the eye test and the hands-on test.


First, look down at them. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on their back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see their ribs without having to press hard. If you can't, they need less food and more exercise.


You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Lab puppy. These dogs grow very rapidly between the age of four and seven weeks, making them susceptible to bone disorders. Feed your puppy a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast.

"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself"

That is why we are here to help you get your favorite Labrador Retriever pup today!